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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
? deflected in tehran or something like that? >> andrea: doesn't it make you nervous that nasa is being dismantled by the administration? how are we supposed to know when they are coming? >> bob: nasa was not who intercepted this. it was department of defense. it was not nasa. >> andrea: right. nasa doesn't have anything to do with space. >> bob: i don't think the republicans. this is a waste of time. if it hits your house, well -- this is not hateful. i don't want it to hit your house. if it hits the russians, too bad, too. any human being, too bad. with the exception of a few i can think of. >> eric: this is irrelevant. [ overtalk ] bronc you upset about that? >> eric: no. everything is fine. can we point out the weekend away that the department of homeland security spent the money on, they spent money on $40 billion in various projects like in arizona $90,000 to fund and install video monitoring system for security cameras in chicago. guess what happened? never put security camera up? >> andrea: what is going on? >> dana: this is strange. i understand a training video for a lot of th
as a large asteroid makes it very close trip pass the art. these are nasa radar images and illustrations of * d a 14. the 150 m diameter rocks is going to pass so close to earth, that it will be even closer than some satellites! nasa says that it will be the best opportunity " never " to monitor a near miss by an object so large, and learn more about astroid past predictions. no need to worry, though, nasa scientists say that it will definitely not hit the globe. astronomers say and ask for this size would cause an expulsion equivalent to 82 and a half megaton bomb. we will be right back. >> here are the afternoon highs. is going to be a nice day. it will be 69 degrees impala alto. fairfield will be popping out at 70 degrees. bridgman will be at 67 degrees. it will be 71 degrees for santa rosa. your kron 47 day around the bay highlights that warmer weather will be for the weekend and we may see some light rain as we head into next tuesday and wednesday. >> we're not tracking any hot spots but here is your bridge to check. the drive times are still from 18 to 20 minutes. the san mateo bri
apparently unfounded. nasa is using radar and other technology to study how the asteroid behaves, including its rotation rate, its composition and how it's impacted by the earth's gravity. the idea is to learn enough to prevent cat as it sfroe fee from it threatening in the future. >> we're going to get a lot of information about the asteroid. we're interested in its future motion, whether or not it could come back, whether it threatens the earth. >> reporter: the odds are either this one or another will be back. an asteroid impact the earth about every 120 years on average. it will be visible in the northern hemisphere this evening if you have access to a telescope. for now it's on its way away from the earth out into outer space harmlessly rotating -- or resolving -- excuse me. harmlessly rotating -- i can't even think of the right word. orbiting the sun. harmlessly at least for now, jim. >> casey, thanks very much. we appreciate it. ? or gal lat particular news, a meteor lit up the skies over eastern russia. the blinding light was followed by a series of deafening explosions. listen to t
nervous now that nasa is beingng dismantled by this administration? how are we supposed to know -- >> i thought nasa was supposed to do outreach to the muslim community. >> oh, right. >> it was the department of defense. >> no. >> it was not nasa. >> you're right. does -- doesn't have anything to do with space, bob. >> no, no. i think it's waste of time.is asteroid is going to come, what is it going to do? if it hits your house, well, it's a sad thing. i don't want it to hit your house or anybody. if it. hits the russians, that's too bad, too. if it hits any human, it's toong bad. with the exception of a few i could thinkep of. >> that's irrelevant right now. >> therec: are 1,000 people wha? >> are you upset about this? >> no. can we point out that video, that weekend away that the department of homeland security spent all that money on, they also spent money, somewhere around $40 billion over the last ten years on various projects like in arizona where these 90na grand to fund and install video monitoring systems at the peoria sports complex to put securityer cameras in chicago and the
there are a million such objects out there. nasa is doing a very good job cataloging all the ones they can, but so far they've been able to find just about 10,000 of them. so we're a little ways away from having the complete inventory. >> schieffer: well, let me just ask you this question-- is there something the government ought to be doing or science ought to be doing that it's not doing? >> actually, believe it or not we are handling this one well. in 1995, nasa authorized-- or rather, congress authorized nasa to scan the skies 24 hours a at day, seven days a week, to look for these objects and we're doing it at three observatories in california, new mexico, and puerto rico. and those three observatories have accounted for about 98% of the bodies we know are out there. now, there are ways to defend ourselves once we know it's out there. and we have the technology to do it. it's just a question of putting the money together and deciding to do that. >> schieffer: all right well, that is a little bit reassuring, and thank you very much for helping us on something that most of us know absolutely nothin
them. so nasa is very good the at finding the much larger ones. but these smaller ones we as humans have not put a lot of effort into it. at the planetary society, we have people that are interested in it and we found this one. >> i want to bring in jason carroll, at the new york museum of natural history. tell us what you're learn building this huge astroid that will get very close to us today. >> well, let me give you some perspective. this meteorite is just about roughly the size of a car, i would say. da-14 which will be swinging by the earth later on this afternoon is about half the size of a football field. so much, much, much larger. and it will be traveling at a rate of about 17,450 miles per hour. that's something like 4.8 miles per second. so it's traveling at an incredible rate. weighs much larger than the meteorite you see behind me here. it will pass by at it closest point about 2:24 p.m. eastern standard time. if you're in indonesia, that is your best vantage point to see. it will be dark there at that particular time. but if you have a telescope, you should be able to
yesterday. nasa calls this a once in a century event. a meteor, pretty sizeable one, as a matter of fact, screamed out of the sky and slammed to earth. more than 1,000 people were hurt and thousands of buildings damaged. cnn's phil black is in russia. he hit the road today, trying to find the spot where the meteor landed. >> are we're walking on a frozen lake. it's about a 90-minute drive west. we're here because locals say a big fragment from the meteor punched through the ice. and is now sitting at the bottom of the lake. [ speaking in russian ] >> that was a very firm no. these police officers said it is prohibited for us to be here, to shoot video here, to try and walk any further. if if part of that meet orrite came down there, where those vehicles are, as locals say it did, the russian authorities don't want us or anyone else to see it. the meteor's final descent through the atmosphere was seen by people all across this region. at this school, students came outside to look at the trail of smoke it left in the sky. one student captured the moment on his phone. what were you thinking
from nasa? >> we've been to nasa. they treat us like we're a bunch of space ka deads. but this could be a game-changer. >> why is it important? >> it's important because we need an insurance poll i. inevitably we're going to need one. it's inevitable. we need to have an early warning system and president obama had stated that a priority would be to land on an asteroid that. could help to focus our efforts to not just land on an asteroid but to deflect an asteroid. so bruce willis watch out. >> if we did know about this asteroid, is there anyway to take it out before we head toward earth? >> we don't want it to come to earth. what we need to do is nudge it or push it when it's farther out. that would take a few decades to get a booster asteroid on it. >> early detection would make a difference too. >> early detection is the key to it took years to build this business. the moment my moderate to severe chronic plaque psoriasis started getting in the way that was it... it was time for a serious talk with my dermatologist. this time, he prescribed humira-adalimumab. humi
: nasa say this fireball in russia this week is believed to be the largest reporting since 1908. that's when a meteorite hit siberia, destroying an estimated 80 billion of trees. >> so why are all these encounters of a space kind of we're going to talk with jeffrey kluger. >> thanks for having me. >> when you see this coming in a group of threes, you wonder how rare is that? how unusual is it? >> not only is it not unusual but it's exceedingly common. the earth is hit with 100 pieces of debris err day, the size of basketball. every few days like a volkswagen. you should think of our planet as playing in traffic. >> it's disconcerting. >> how come we don't hear about it more often? >> because remember the atmosphere is like a wall of concrete which is why we get beautiful sky shows. it incinerated on the way down due to air friction. the problem is when the rock becoming too big to be consumed earn tirely then it bursts above ground which is call and air burst and that's what creates the technology. >> we hear that they need to shoot things down but don't have i
it was a rocky meteor, about 10% iron. they believe a larger fragment is still under water. nasa says the meteor was 55 feet wide and weighed 10,000 tons. >>> more reaction today to the apparent suicide of country music star mindy mccready. she burst onto the music scene when she was just 18. as manuel bahorkes reports for wjz, her quick success was followed by a slow, painful, unraveling. >> i can tell he's going to ask me to dance ♪ >> reporter: mindy mccready rose to fame in 1996, with her debut album, 10,000 angels. but it was her life outside the recording studio that stole the spotlight. >> just google, and you'll see the images that pop up. she's got several mug shots. >> reporter: on top of stints in and out of jail and rehab, the singer was plagued by a long list of other problems. eight years ago, billy mcknight, the father of her oldest son, was charged with attempting to kill her. in 2008, she made headlines again over a rumored affair with baseball pitching legend roger clemens that reportedly started in her teens. two years later, on
-wide asteroid heading for earth. here's an image of the asteroid from nasa when it was more than 450,000 miles from earth. tom foreman has the details on how close it will get. >> let's get reference points. we talk about the earth many of us like to think the moon is close to us but the moon is not as close as you think. it's almost a quarter million miles away so what is close in space in satellites, we've been launching these for decades and filled the sky. some are fairly low, others quite high. the highest are communications and gps satellites, about 22,000 miles up in the air. where is this asteroid going to be? it is going to shoot out of the sky and cut right through the top of the satellite belt, at about 17,000 miles. >> an awful lot going on in the skies right now so we're joined by bill nye the science guy, is he in los angeles. bill, the meteor shower in russia, the ast noid some 17,000 miles away, i think everyone really has two questions here, first of all, is there a connection here and is there a difference between a meteor shower and an asteroid? help us out. >> oh, yeah, yea
it passes by earth tomorrow morning but you will be able to watch the historic site online. nasa will stream the approach starting at 9:00 a.m. at pacific time. the fly-by is expected to be the closest an asteroid has ever come to earth. it will be -- it will be about 17,000 miles from earth. the closest will be in indonesia. astronomers say it's about the size of a white house. >> that's a big boy. >> yeah, it is pretty big. >>> 7:54. >>> steve and i have been on fog patrol. we went on the air at 4:30 we've been watching it for hours now. steve will talk about the fog. but visibility is improving for drivers. if you are driving to the bay bridge toll plaza, that even looks a little bit better. the fog was pretty low at one point. it's backed under for about a 25 to 30-minute delay. that's your live drive time there. once you get on the bridge, another 12 to 15 minutes on the span. also, contra costa county is beginning to get slower. traffic time is way down from pleasant hill to walnut creek in danville and alamo. let's go to steve. >>> we still have areas of fog. other locations are alrea
are a total nerd and i think indra is, at 2:00, you can watch on the nasa website where they will track it too. and we'll track it. >> yes, we will. thank you, indra. >>> up next. a potential security flaw in the iphone 5 and its latest operating system. it exposed how password are, messages and contact list can all be hacked. bikes and balloon, wholesome noodles on spoons. a kite, a breeze, a dunk of grilled cheese. catches and throws, and spaghettio's. that's what happy kids are made of. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. try our entrees, snacks and new salads. wild salmon with basil, garlic chicken spring rolls, and now salads, like asian-style chicken. enjoy 100 delicious varieties under 400 calories. lean cuisine. enjoy 100 delicious varieties under 400 calories. for over 75 years people ...with geico... ohhh...sorry!. director's voice: here we go. from the top. and action for over 75 years people have saved money with gecko so.... director's voice: cut it! ...what...what did i say? gecko? i said gecko? aw... for over 75 year...(laughs. but still trying to keep it contained) direc
system, nasa's space exploration program, and noaa's work on necessary new satellites. these are weather satellite programs. these are sequestration's negative impacts. the diverse group of leaders here with us today is going to be attesting to this. regarding the overall economy, about six months ago we released a study conducted by dr. stephen fuller of george mason university. the study's methodology is sound and its conclusions are grim. if sequestration is going forward, it will put 2.1 million u.s. jobs at risk. these are defense and non- defense-related jobs, and include nearly 1 million small businesses. it will cost the unemployment rate to rise about 1.5%, and reduce expected gdp growth by $215 billion. $215 billion. the latest congressional budget office forecast reinforces the conclusion, that sequestration will undermine economic growth. today we are re-releasing dr. fuller's study and his analysis of the impact of impact of sequestration. let it be noted no one can say that they were not forewarned about the full consequences of this very bad policy. this morning, to emphas
history have combined to discover. so it will do that every month. >> watch more on former nasa astronaut ed lew and his urgent mission to save planet earth. this sunday on "the next list." ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] what's the point of an epa estimated 42 miles per gallon if the miles aren't interesting? the lexus ct hybrid. this is the pursuit of perfection. good afternoon. chase sapphire. (push button tone) this is stacy from springfield. oh whoa. hello? yes. i didn't realize i'd be talking to an actual person. you don't need to press "0," i'm here. reach a person, not a prompt whenever you call chase sapphire. why should saturday night have all the fun? get two times the points on dining in restaurants, with chase sapphire preferred. >>> welcome back to "starting point." a quick look at some of the top stories this morning. a critical court date this afternoon for george zimmerman, the man accused of killing florida teen trayvon martin. a judge will decide whether to move ahead with a stand your ground hearing in april. if zimmerman's attorneys are successful there and prove he ha
katrina, sandy reshaped the coastline and devastated homes, businesses and lives. nasa says the evidence shows humans are contributing to global warming. still, the realities in washington test the bounds of how we as a nation respond. in his state of the union address, the president told members of congress that if they don't act, he will. >> eye will direct my cabinet to come up with actions we can take to reduce pollution, prepare communities for climate change, and speed the transition to more sustainable sources of energy. >> last year president obama rejected a permit to build the keystone pipeline. but democrats are torn between a base of supporters who strongly oppose the project and the potential business boom by adding thousands of new jobs into the work force. that permit now rests in the hands of the state department, and secretary john kerry, who in august suggested climate change is as dangerous as iran, nuclear weapons, and war. now, on february 8, kerry met with canada's foreign minister, and he promised a fair, transparent and prompt decision on that. i don't know. it's
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)